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Guru Roundup: 2017_02_24

Just a quickie to let you know what has my attention today. Feel free to let me know what you’re reading about when it comes to the world of textbooks and college bookstores.

 

Follett Names New COO

Follett Corp. Names George F. Coe (Baker & Taylor) As COO

Follett got its man as the college bookstore giant named George F. Coe (formerly of Baker & Taylor) its new COO. This is in no way unexpected as Follett continues its rapid consolidation of the college bookstore market. Take a look at what Follett has scooped up in terms of both retail and distribution in less than two years:

  • June 2015: Follett acquired Neebo, Nebraska Book Company’s retail division, adding 200+ college bookstores both on campus and off campus (not to mention Neebo.com).
  • April 2016: Follett acquired Baker and Taylor, thus taking control of the distribution side of academic bookselling.
  • February 2017: Follett names former B&T executive Coe as COO effective March 31, 2017.

Follett’s strategy of vertical integration makes sense in light of the necessity of competing against Amazon. Coupling its already significant college bookstore footprint with Neebo, in addition to buttressing its logistical back-end operations with the Baker & Taylor acquisition, gives Follet a strong bricks-and-mortar competitive advantage that is difficult to replicate. It remains to be seen whether this will be enough to withstand the Amazon juggernaut.

Barnes & Noble Education and Pearson PLC Stocks Getting Crushed

The Bad News from the Textbook Market Keeps Coming

Both Barnes & Noble Education and Pearson PLC saw double-digit drops in their stock prices recently after sales failed to meet Wall Street expectations. B&N Education (NYSE: BNED) CEO Max Roberts said that the decline was related to lower enrollment at colleges and a “softer retail environment.”

Taking a hit far worse than B&N Education, Pearson PLC (NYSE: PSO) lost 29% of its value in one day in mid-January after dramatically lowering revenue-and-profit expectations for 2017. How bad has it gotten for Pearson? Well, the folks at The Motley Fool writePearson stock is now down 66% over the past three years, and the market is showing no confidence that the company will turn itself around anytime soon” and Bloomberg’s “Pearson Forecasts Years of Textbook Gloom; to Sell Penguin” is in no way reassuring.

The Elephant in the Room

B&N Education and Pearson are really proxies for the whole textbook industry. The underlying causes of the industry malaise are rooted in two powerful trends: demographics and technology. After reaching a peak of 17.3 million students in 2010, college enrollment decreased 4% between 2010 and 2014 to 16.6 million in 2014 (according to the National Center of Education Statistics). This falling college enrollment is unprecedented, and obviously fewer students equals fewer textbook sales. Technical trends, including new business models (rentals), online sales, and digital books, further undermine the old model of new textbook sales to students through brick-and mortar-campus bookstores.

While the publishers try new tactics such as access codes and custom publishing in order to revive sales of new textbooks and shrink the used-textbook marketplace, the fact of the matter is these types of tactics only serve to alienate their customer base. Students are not stupid; they realize that algebra doesn’t change that much from year to year, so why should the textbook? The publishers would be well advised to create value-added services or pass on savings for students instead of thinking up new ways to milk students for their last dollar by inflating book prices.

The textbook industry is in the midst of some serious disruption. It will be interesting to see how it all plays out.

Welcome to the New Textbook Guru! A Quick Update.

Back from hiatus and with a new look and a new Guru, the blog for all things textbooks has returned. Guru Jeff has moved on and switched industries and he’s doing great in his new endeavors. Thanks to him for his development of TheTextbookGuru.com; I’m excited to dive in and pick up the conversation.

I’m Alex Neal, the new Textbook Guru, and I’ll be your guide to and through the textbook industry. A bit about me: I’m an experienced and successful entrepreneur and the creator of CampusBooks.com. I’ve been in the online textbook business for nearly two decades and I’m an expert on textbooks, academic publishing and bookselling, e-commerce and price-comparison, digital marketing, as well as larger business development beyond the textbook industry. You can learn more about me, contact me about my areas of expertise, or pick my brain about textbooks and technology.

Going forward, I’ll be tackling all things textbooks such as eBooks and digital delivery, buying vs. renting textbooks, international editions, supplements and custom editions, mobile apps, industry players and trends, legislation regarding the high cost of textbooks, the role of the bookstore today and going forward, and so much more.

You can expect to be hearing from me very soon. In the meantime, check out the Archive and the Tag Cloud. I’ve made available all of TheTextbookGuru.com v1. If there are topics that you’d like me to revisit, drop a line. I’d love to hear from you.

Alex

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): Udacity

hen30xjvWelcome back to our series on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Today we are taking a look at one of the largest platforms in the field, Udacity. In case you missed it, we’ve already looked at the MOOC phenomenon in general and what to expect when enrolling in an MOOC. We also looked at one of the other big players in the space, edX. (more…)

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): Class in Session


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Recently I broached the subject of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), which have very recently exploded onto the academic scene. They are an exciting new way of learning; able to reach thousands of students simultaneously while being completely free. It’s an attractive concept, but the question is how this concept performs in the real world. Today we’ll take a look at what it’s like to take an MOOC. (more…)

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Student Seller, Against Textbook Publishers

In a decision of great consequence to our industry (as well as to all things copyright), the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday ruled 6-3 in favor of allowing resellers who buy copyrighted products abroad to resell them in domestically without permission from copyright owners. (more…)

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): An Overview

http://www.scmp.com/sites/default/files/styles/980w/public/2012/11/16/ce16a159d9276ca2c12c81a0bfa2a4e3.jpgI have been hopefully following the movement towards more affordable education for a while now, primarily tracking the growth of digital textbooks and their impact on the high prices student’s pay for education. However, if you’ve read my reviews of the major eTextbook platforms, you’ll know that while eBooks are innovating textbooks with interactive rich media and customization, they are still little more than digital versions of paper books. The kind of innovation that is really going to move the needle on education isn’t a repackaging of existing tools, it’s a rethinking of the tools themselves. This is where Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are succeeding, by flipping the academic model on its head. (more…)