eBooks Platform Reviews: The Wrap-Up Show!

As we get deeper into summer, I wanted to spend a moment and recap the eBooks platform reviews we’ve covered over the past six months. This project stems from a discussion I was having about eBooks and the different reader technology on the market. While speaking about each provider, I realized that I had never purchased a book, downloaded it, and tried it, I’d only read hardware specs and handled some devices, but I’d never really knuckled down with a text from start to finish. How could I speak about the different products being used if I hadn’t tried them myself?

First, I tried to think of who the major players were specific to the college textbook space. Then for each book, I wanted to experience it as a student. That said, I never asked for a free copy and instead I went to the company’s website or app, selected a book, and downloaded. While exploring each book, I tried to pay particular attention to the features that were touted by the provider so that I could comment on them (good or bad). By trying to place my mind inside the mind of a student, I was able to look at each book and its overall application in the college setting.

The eBook platforms I covered include:
Chegg
CourseSmart
iBook
iBooks Publishing
Inkling
Kindle
Kno

I was never looking to pick a winner and that remains the case in my approach. Each platform has unique positive and negative features. The one thing that really surprised me was the primitive social features integrated into the eBooks and the lack of thinking “off the page.” The truth is that eBooks have a long way to go. What we have today begins to engage the student in a new way but all the platforms are simply an extension of the physical book. While features such as video, 3D, note cards, highlighting, and more are currently standard features, the book is still stuck in its “chapter” format (that is, it’s a digital version of a print book with a few interactive features that don’t rely on pen-and-paper but mimic them). Until the textbook is truly unbound and digital courses are created from scratch, we will be limited by the small-scale book-mimicry advancements we can make in eBooks.

Comments (4)

  1. Steve Vernon

    It’s been a long time since college – but I still remember the cost of buying new textbooks – not to mention the weight of those huge unwieldy suckers that gave a whole new meaning to the words “course load”. I’ve always felt that the e-book platform is a natural for college textbooks.

    Reply
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