Guru Roundup

Textbook Guru Roundup: April 24, 2017

It’s all about cutting costs — for textbook publishers and college students

New or Modified Models That Lower Purchase Prices

  • The Tufts Daily: New Student-Run Textbook Exchange Initiative to Begin in Fall 2017 — “A new student-run textbook exchange will start in September, according to Tufts Community Union (TCU) Senator Philip Miller . . . According to Miller, a first-year, this initiative seeks to create a physical location for the existing textbook exchange schemes online. ‘There is already an Excel document floating around online and a Facebook group, but we’re trying to create a place on campus that students can go to drop off and pick up new books,’ Miller said…”

Open Educational Resources/Open-Source Textbooks

  • Inside Higher Ed: A New Channel for OER — “Open educational resources provider Lumen Learning has a new partner in its effort to get more faculty members to use alternatives to commercial textbooks: the college bookstore. Lumen, a start-up based in Portland, Ore., said on Monday that it had teamed up with Follett, creating a new channel for its course content to reach more faculty members…”
  • Quartz Media: States Are Moving to Cut College Costs by Introducing Open-Source Textbooks — “Every cost associated with higher learning has steadily increased over the past decade, but none more so than college textbooks. While tuition increased by 63% between 2006 and 2016, and housing costs increased by 50%, the cost of textbooks went up by 88%, according to data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics…”

Bad News for Industry Jobs

  • Boston Business Journal: Houghton Mifflin Plans to Cut Hundreds of Employees — “Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Co., the Boston-based education publisher facing financial headwinds, said it plans to cut as much as 10 percent of its workforce in effort to save money, according to regulatory filing…”

 

The Textbook Guru Roundup: March 3, 2017 Edition

Seriously busy week and one that’s been heavy on textbook-related news. Here’s what’s on my mind as I head into the weekend.

Lesser News But Still Worthy of Our Attention:

Textbook Guru – Recap

Another rush has ended and before we know it the holiday’s will be here. As we end the 3rd quarter I thought I would do another round up of the some of the most-important and most-read Textbook Guru posts. The big update over the past quarter has been the launch of the new blog. Let me know how you like you. www.thetextbookguru.com (more…)

Guru Round Up: This Weeks Industry News

Adaptive Learning Platforms Knewton & Grockit Get Boost to Funding

“Last week, the test prep company Knewton announced that it had raised $33 million, bringing the total amount raised by the company to $54 million. And today, another test prep startup Grockitannounces its latest fundraising: $7 million, bringing its total investment to over $24 million. Clearly there’s big money in test prep. (more…)

Guru Roundup: Bringing You the Industry’s Need-to-Know News

Financial Edge: Who Will Dominate The Electronic Textbook Market?

“Two of the biggest book retailers in the U.S., Amazon and Barnes and Noble, both offer electronic textbook rentals. The service doesn’t always offer cost savings compared to purchasing a traditional textbook, but it does offer convenience. If you’re not sure where to shop, consider how the two companies compare on pricing, rental terms, portability and other factors . . .” (more…)

Comparing Prices for the Top Used, New and e-book Retailers

Last week, we launched CampusBooks’ new e-book search service, and with it,findings comparing the availability of the top 1000 textbooks at each of those e-book merchants (see what Mashable had to say about it, too). This week, we took it one step further, and compared what everyone actually cares about: pricing. (more…)

Guru Roundup: Special eTextbooks Rentals Edition

Business Wire: CampusBooks Finds Just 18% of Textbooks Available on Amazon’s Kindle Rental

“CampusBooks.com compared pricing data for the top 100 college textbooks against Amazon’s new Kindle Rental service, and found that Kindle Rental often has the best prices, but only 18% of the titles. Renting a Kindle book for the advertised 30-day period yielded the highest savings, often in the double-digits over traditional rental, used and new textbooks, but only five of 100 titles were available for the month-long range. The other 13 titles available had minimum periods of 60 days, and the savings were less. However, if students were to rent via Kindle for a whole semester (120 days), only half of the time was Kindle Rental cheaper than buying and selling a used book . . . ” (more…)