Tag Archive: inkling

The Move to Digital: Why Publishers Want It to Succeed (and what we’ve learned)

Move to Digital

As we study the move to digital reading, we are introduced to new players such as the Worldwide Center of Mathematics, Flat World Knowledge, and others such as Inkling, Kno, and increasingly more. But the more-traditional players, the established textbook publishers, are not far behind and they have their hands in the game as well. Remember, they own the content and while new players like FWK will get some adoptions, the publishers will not give up market share without a fight.

Own the Platform

Kind of like a hedge bet in Vegas when you place your bet to cover your other bets, the publishers are spreading their risk by taking ownership of the industry via  different platforms. McGraw-Hill and Pearson own stakes in Inkling while all six major publishers have stakes in CourseSmart. I think we would be naïve not to believe that if one platform were to really take off (this has yet to happen where there is a de facto standard), the publishers would be wise to invest in or own it. In addition, a successful platform is only as good as the content it delivers.

Own the Content

Academic publishers are working with different platforms to control the price, market share, and content. It will be hard for start-ups to take away significant adoptions from traditional print publishers unless they can prove to faculty and administrations that the books desired by the educational community are available on the platforms or learning systems that educators desire.

Kill the Used Book

Why do publishers really love the eBook/eTextbook? Because it is the first real used-book killer they have found. The publishers have tried for years to shrink the used-book market as it drastically diminishes their sales. They started off by marking teachers’ editions and desk copies, even drilling holes and other tactics to make these books unsellable. Then they began frequently changing the editions, adding components to create packages and bundles, and updating the book (however slightly) to make last year’s copy seem obsolete. With changes requiring publishers to unbundle books and to make ISBNs and prices more upfront, publishers now need to find a new way to keep the used-book business from hurting their overall profit. Enter the digital platform.

(more…)

The Move To Digital: Breakdown of the Big Three in Digital Learning Platforms

Move to Digital
As with any new technology, it can be tough to navigate the territory. As a starter, I’ve rounded up three of the top digital learning platforms getting the most attention today: Xplana, Inkling and Kno.

1. Xplana

Xplana is a great source for those who have access to the Internet. Xplana offers free e-textbooks for a wide range of courses online. Xplana is purely online, and it offers more than textbooks. Xplana plans to turn its platform into a social network of sorts, allowing students to help one another while utilizing the resources on the site. Xplana has released an app for Android, as well as an app for the iPhone, that will allow students to access their materials on the go, as well.

What others are saying:

“Just as new devices have helped spawn the growth in e-books, Xplana also points to some significant developments around open educational resources (OER) and open textbooks. States and institutions have embarked on a number of OER initiatives to help address the affordability and availability of textbooks, including Washington State’s Open Course Library project, a program that aims to make core college materials available on the Web for less than $30 per class.” Read Write Web

“Launched in 2010, Xplana.com currently has more than 400,000 educational assets – e-books, open educational resources, and curated content – available to its community of users in a wide range of subjects from agriculture and animals to English and languages, science and computer science and non-academic areas.” Taxo Diary

Pros: Since Xplana is online, it’s easy to access, and doesn’t involve carrying anything extra around.  The fact that it’s free is perfect for starving students who don’t need any extra monthly fees or the like. The apps for both Androids and iPhones make it so that students can access what they need at any time, since most people usually carry smartphones these days. (more…)